Archive for April, 2009

Supporting Local Green Builders

April 17, 2009

This past Wednesday, Bluebeam attended the Municipal Green Building Conference in Downey, CA. The conference was an opportunity for Los Angeles-area municipalities to meet with design and building professionals and discuss ways to build a greener southern California.

The conference was hosted by the Southern California Gas Company and United States Green Building Council (USGBC), Los Angeles Chapter. As members of the USGBC, Bluebeam felt it was important to support the Chapter’s event. After all, the whole purpose was to help make our community more sustainable and energy efficient. So, we exhibited and demonstrated how Bluebeam PDF Revu can play a part in green building by helping design and building firms reduce their paper usage.

Check out these photos from the conference:

Wednesday was a beautiful day in southern California to talk about green building.

Wednesday was a beautiful day in southern California to talk about green building.

My coworker Joel demonstrating how Bluebeam can help design professionals cut paper usage.

My coworker Joel demonstrating how Bluebeam can help design professionals cut paper usage.

Inside a crowded education session discussing ways to green Los Angeles and its surrounding communities.

Inside a crowded education session discussing ways to green Los Angeles and its surrounding communities.

Bluebeam’s special features for architecture, engineering and construction firms make it a great paperless solution for green builders.

Bluebeam’s special features for architecture, engineering and construction firms make it a great paperless solution for green builders.

– Karen


Bookmark and Share

Resizing Photos in Revu

April 14, 2009

A few weeks ago I bought a photo frame collage that looks something like this:

collage02

I like these frames because they let me display a lot of photos.  But I don’t like having to resize photos into odd shapes, like 3”x3” squares, and print them out. First, it isn’t the most exciting task, know what I mean? And second, the photo editing software I have only lets me print one image per page. Photo paper is expensive, and I hate wasting it.

Thankfully, I realized that Revu could help me resize my photos quickly and also help me save some of that precious photo paper.

You see, Revu’s Properties Panel gives you a lot of control for manipulating markups, including allowing you to resize them. In fact, the layouts portion of the Properties Panel includes a field where you can adjust your markup’s size by simply typing in the desired width and height.

properties-panel-resizing-photo2

So to print my photos, I used Bluebeam’s Insert Image tool to insert them into a blank PDF. Then I went straight to the Properties Panel to edit the sizes. I filled that PDF up with as many resized photos that would fit on the page, and printed it out. It was easy to do, and I didn’t waste my photo paper.

What cool things have you discovered in Bluebeam? Let me know. And remember, to keep on PDF’ing!

-Karen


Bookmark and Share

Bluebeam Productions: Behind the Video

April 9, 2009

Yesterday Bluebeam Software debuted its latest video, Drowning in paper, in the monthly Bluebeam Insider newsletter. The video shows various office professionals performing tedious paper-intensive tasks – sorting, stapling, copying, stamping, filing, printing, etc. Basically, it shows many of the reasons why companies turn to Bluebeam PDF Revu to go paperless.

You may not realize this, but there’s a team of Bluebeam employees who produce all videos and podcasts completely in-house. We call ourselves “Bluebeam Productions”. This time around, I had my digital camera with me on filming day. Here are a few snapshots of the behind-the-scenes action:

We practice what we preach. Bluebeam Productions uses Revu to create and redline PDF storyboards.

We practice what we preach. Bluebeam Productions uses Revu to create and redline PDF storyboards.

Lighting the set and framing the shot.

Lighting the set and framing the shot.

The paper-filled office is ready to be filmed. This person should definitely ditch that paper for Bluebeam PDF Revu.

The paper-filled office is ready to be filmed. This person should definitely ditch that paper for Bluebeam PDF Revu.

If you want to see other videos we’ve created, you can go to the Bluebeam PDF Revu YouTube Channel. And remember, to keep on PDF’ing!

-Karen

Bookmark and Share

Hollywood Script Supervisors Using Bluebeam on Tablet PCs

April 7, 2009

This summer’s next Hollywood blockbuster, brought to you by PDF? Well, maybe.

A while back, we released a case study from a Hollywood script supervisor, who used Bluebeam on a tablet pc to significantly reduce the amount of time spent redlining scripts and production notes, and distributing revisions to editors and producers.

This past weekend, Bluebeam was once again on Hollywood’s radar. Bluebeam user Mary Louise McCloskey was a presenter at the Digital Script Supervising Workshop. The event, hosted by Cinema Workshops in Burbank, CA, was an opportunity for script supervisors to discuss various digital technologies that could improve their workflow.

A Bluebeam user talks about how she uses Revu to annotate Hollywood scripts.

A Bluebeam user talks about how she uses Revu to annotate Hollywood scripts.

At the event, Mary Louise shared how she uses Bluebeam PDF Revu on a tablet pc to make and track notes on scripts more quickly and efficiently during her session, “The Tablet: Digital Handwriting.” She talked about Bluebeam’s various markup tools that are accessible with a tablet pen, including the pressure sensitive pen, lines, a free text tool that recognizes ink and converts it to text, and more. Additionally, McCloskey shared how she uses Bluebeam’s tool chest to save commonly used annotations for faster markup. My coworker Joel also attended the event, and answered a few questions about Bluebeam at the end of the session.

When Joel told me that he would be attending this workshop, I knew I’d have to share it with everyone on the blog. After all, it’s a pretty interesting use of Bluebeam. What do you think? And remember, to keep on PDF’ing!

-Karen

Bookmark and Share


%d bloggers like this: